27 July03 August 2018

Experience it on sea and shore!

The West Highland yachting week is one of the leading international yachting events, in stunning surroundings, with a winning combination of round the buoys and passage racing, supported by an excellent social programme. It is also unique as it moves around the west coast of Scotland starting in Craobh Haven south of Oban then moving into Oban before finally arriving in Tobermory on the Isle of Mull.

Unlike many other events, West Highland Week encourages competitors to enter for individual races if they do not want to take part in the whole Series. Some choose to enter only for the passages races, or just one race – or even a Feeder Race before going off on a cruise.

In addition to spinnaker classes, restricted sail classes are offered which attract skippers with limited experience, crew or equipment. Whilst these classes also suit the yachts with small children aboard, some of the most competitive crew members are the children themselves!

Many competitors are infrequent racers, often first timers – the Committee is always delighted to encourage those dipping a toe into racing waters for the first time.

 

Venues

West Highland Yachting Week is one of those rare regattas that moves from centre to centre during the event. This creates enormous logistical difficulties for the organisers, but provides an ever-changing scene, both ashore and afloat, for competitors.

On Sunday, with the whole fleet  will be racing in lower Loch Melfort, Loch Shuna  and South of Loch Shuna, and on Monday all will race up to Oban, which will be the base until Wednesday morning.

The race on Wednesday up to Tobermory is always a challenge with fickle winds and tides, and where even local knowledge doesn’t prevent yachts from “falling into holes” and having to watch others sailing by on the other side of the Sound. Tobermory, one of the most visually attractive harbours anywhere, always provides a great welcome for the fleet, and the view from the upper levels of the town across the bay, with the whole fleet at anchor, is a fine sight. Tobermory provides a small but excellent collection of shops, pubs and eating establishments, and can supply most needs.

After two nights in Tobermory, the fleet races back down the Sound of Mull, hoping for a good breeze to get them through the channel between Duart Point and Lismore before the change of tide necessitates a shortened course. Yachts then come back into Oban Bay for the final night’s celebrations.